Cheap Versus Expensive Copywriters – Which Should You Choose?

Sometimes small figures can make a massive difference.

For example, the difference between a 1% and a 2% conversion rate sounds small, right?

Wrong.

If a 1% conversion rate pulls you in $2,000 of sales a month, then a 2% conversion rate would bring you $4,000 of sales a month… doubling your revenue!

Ultimately, the difference between an “expensive” and a “cheap” copywriter might be a 2% conversion rate compared to 1%…

… but that additional 1% doubles your revenue. That’s one of the advantages an “expensive” copywriter could bring to the table – an additional $24,000 a year in revenue (in this example).

Or looked at from a different angle, a “cheap” copywriter would throw $24,000 of your money down the drain – year in, year out.

With that in mind, is it really a smart idea to hunt around for the “cheapest” copywriter? I don’t think so.

Of course, if you’re just starting out and you need a sales letter written, I understand why you’d want to keep your costs down.

Just keep in mind that by going the “cheap” route, you could be throwing a lot of future revenue down the drain.

If you were building a house, you wouldn’t skimp on the foundations. That would be foolish, and a little dangerous, don’t you think?

Well, your sales material is the FOUNDATION of your business. It’s what generates the sales! The last thing you want to do is skimp on this aspect.

Now, I’m not really pitching anything here. (I do have a stable of students who are willing to write for various budgets – contact me if you’d like me to put you in touch with one)…

… but the bottom line is this: with copywriting, the difference between a “cheap” and an “expensive” copywriter isn’t just the price, almost always it will be reflected in the results.

So lay a solid foundation for your business, and don’t skimp on the thing that is going to generate you the sales, the lifeblood of your business!

Why People Aren’t Taking Your FREE Stuff

free

What price is FREE?

It’s strange, isn’t it? You can give away something for FREE… and even then, not everyone will take you up on it.

Actually, it’s not so strange when you recognize there is something we ALL have that is even more valuable than money – and that’s time.

There are no rich and poor time owners. All of us have exactly the same quantity of time to play with each day – 1,440 minutes.

When you offer something to somebody for free, there’s still a cost attached. It’s the cost of time. You might offer the most wonderful 38 page ebook as an enticement for capturing their email address, but they have to determine whether spending a few hours of their life reading your ebook is worth their time.

Whenever I give away free information, I tend to follow two rules of thumb:

  1. Give them exactly what they want.
  2. Give it to them in bite-size chunks.

For example, I’m in the process right now of creating presell material for a product I’m launching soon called Presell Mastery. The presell material includes several short (8-12 page) reports, that focus on specific topics a reader might want to know about.

For example, a person might ask, “How do I presell as an affiliate marketer?” Well, I’m writing a report to answer that specific question.

I settled on 8-12 pages because it means the report can be read in one sitting, giving THEM exactly what they want quickly, while giving ME the opportunity to presell them gently on a product or two.

Of course, there is a skill to effective preselling, which is precisely why I’m creating a product called Presell Mastery in the first place – but the important thing here is to remember that even FREE comes at a price – the price of time.

That’s why you must still demonstrate VALUE for the things that you offer for free. And I don’t just mean slapping a “$27 value” label on it. Tell us WHY it has a $27 value. What’s in it for them, to spend their valuable time reading or watching your free content?

Give them strong reasons they should spend part of their precious 1,440 minutes listening to YOU. (Oh, and I hope you got some value here! If so, let your Twitter buddies know about this place.)

How Supermarkets Fool You Into Buying More

Supermarkets and pricing

Supermarkets and pricing

I have to marvel at some of the psychological pricing “tricks” supermarkets use to “fool” us into buying more.

I was in the supermarket the other day, and I saw a 72 biscuit box of my favourite breakfast cereal, Weetabix, for £4.90. Now, since I don’t normally see boxes of that size (they normally come in smaller boxes of 24 biscuits), I assumed that was pretty decent value for money – and the average price in my local store for a smaller box was about £2, so I knew this was cheaper than my local store. (Locally, it would cost me £6 for the same number of biscuits).

But then I thought, “Wait… let me check”. So I looked at the price of the 24 biscuit boxes, and they were £1.50.

“Wait a minute,” I thought to myself, puzzled. “I could buy 3 of these smaller boxes [3 x £1.50 = £4.50]… that would be the same number of biscuits as the larger box [£4.90], yet it would be cheaper!”

I grinned smugly to myself as I picked up 3 of the smaller boxes, thinking I had fooled the supermarket and saved myself 40 pence. (Oh, how wrong I was.)

I pointed this out to my brother, and then he said something that totally blew me away.

“So why are you buying 3 boxes?” he asked, casually.

At that moment, I suddenly realized how even more devilishly clever the supermarket was being. I had perceived that I was saving 40 pence by buying 3 individual boxes… but really, I was being “fooled” into buying 3 boxes when I didn’t need to!

At £1.50 for a box of 24 biscuits, I could just as easily have bought 1 or 2 of them… I didn’t need to buy all 3… but because I compared the price of 3 smaller boxes (£4.50) to the higher price of the larger 72 biscuit box (£4.90), I was “fooled” into thinking I’d be making a 40 pence saving by buying 3 smaller boxes!

“Fooled” is probably the wrong word, but the pricing was cleverly devised to get a poor sucker like myself to buy more than I might have done if the higher priced 72 biscuit box wasn’t there!

And if I hadn’t bothered calculating the values in my head, I may have ended up paying 40 pence more for the bigger box!

This highlights a principle I discussed in my report Pricing For Big Profits, that of the contrast principle – which shows that we often look at value in relative, rather than absolute terms.

It was this very principle that nearly led me to buy 3 boxes of Weetabix, when I didn’t really need to at all! I say “nearly”, because after I realized this, I put one of the boxes back… I didn’t need all 3!

I’d love to hear any stories like this that you might have. Please also feel free to share this post with your friends on Twitter.

Ripping Apart The “Prevention” Example Sales Letter (Part 1)

Last post I shared with you a PDF file called The Greatest Sales Letters Of All Time, edited by John Jantsch. (You can download it here if you haven’t already done so.)

Today, let’s go through one of the sales letters, to see why it worked so well. The one I’d like to review is Sales Letter #5, which sells a subscription to Prevention magazine. (This, by the way, is a direct mail letter that was actually mailed out.)

The first thing that immediately stands out to me is that…

There is no headline. The letter assumes it already has the reader’s attention, by virtue of the fact that they are reading the letter. This probably works best for a physical letter, because if you’ve already opened the envelope, you’ve already made a commitment to yourself to at least look at the letter.

Notice also the friendly, personal tone. It’s written almost like one friend writing to another, and it ends with a signature from the writer, Sandy Gibb.

It begins by immediately telling a story, which is something we humans like to hear.

What I liked about the story is that, while Sandy Gibb highlighted the wisdom of her grandmother (in recommending only the healthy stuff), she was quick to deal with the mental objection that “grandmother was hopelessly out of date” – by recalling back to how healthy they were back then, compared to what was happening with food and chemicals in the present time.

Notice also how Sandy’s observations are sufficiently vague, to allow readers to recall their own specific examples. For example…

I was stunned by the number of foods that were almost completely “fake” – most of the good things had been taken out and chemical substitutes put in.

By making it Sandy’s observation, it becomes a fact that can’t be disputed. We could perhaps dispute the nature of Sandy’s observation, but we can’t dispute that Sandy was “stunned” by her observation.

The next sentence builds upon this, and makes it an indisputable fact:

You read about threats and dangers to your health like these every day. In almost every newspaper and magazine you open.

So by this point, it is assumed the reader accepts that there are “threats” and “dangers” to their health – the problem has been explained (and hopefully accepted), and now they are in a better position to accept the solution.

In Part 2 we’ll examine how the solution is presented, in such a way as to build desire for the product. You won’t want to miss it, so make sure you’re signed up to receive free updates to this CopySnips blog.

Are These The Greatest Sales Letters Of All Time?

I recently came across a great little resource edited by John Jantsch of Duct Tape Marketing, and since he gave permission to distribute it freely, I thought I’d share it with you good folks here at the CopySnips.com blog.

It’s a 25 page PDF document called The Greatest Sales Letters Of All Time… and it contains 5 actual sales letters, written to sell products such as a subscription to Newsweek magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and a 20 volume Popular Mechanics Do-It-Yourself Encyclopedia.

These are “sales letters” in the traditional sense of the world – in other words, actual letters posted out to a mailing list. Still, regardless of whether you write to sell for the Web or in print, or even if you’re just here to learn about how to write copy, this is a great resource – you get to see the persuasive devices used by these well-known companies to sell their products through the written word.

We can learn a lot from these sales letters. You’ll notice, for example, the lack of hype. Yes, they’re enthusiastic for their products. (I’d particularly like to buy those Do-It-Yourself Encylopedias!) But they all carefully stay within the bounds of credibility. (Perhaps they can do so easily because these companies are, for the most part, pretty well known.)

Keep this resource handy on your computer, because I’ll be referring to it over the coming days and weeks, as I point out some of the specific persuasive devices being used, so make sure you’re subscribed to this blog as well.

You can download The Greatest Sales Letters Of All Time here.

In return, I’d be grateful if you could refer your friends and colleagues to this post, so we can expand the conversation about it here at CopySnips.com.

How To Create Real, Compelling Urgency

In my last post we discussed what makes people buy now, rather than later… and I said that what was missing was a sense of overwhelming urgency.

The question is, how can you create that sense of urgency in the first place? I’ve written a free 24 page PDF report for you to download, entitled: “Buy Now! – How To Create Compelling Urgency”.

In it, I explore the 3 main ways of doing this:

  1. Explain the reasons why they should take action now, rather than later.
  2. Explain the consequences of not doing so.
  3. Create an offer which creates urgency in a credible way.

So please download and enjoy it. I recommend you download it to your computer, which you can do by right-clicking the link below, and selecting “Save Link As…” or “Save Target As…”

Right-click here to download the BuyNow.pdf report

What Makes People Buy Now?

buy-now-or-elseIt’s probably happened to you many times before.

You see something you really want to buy. You get all excited about it, and you’re even ready to buy.

And then something happens. Maybe you get distracted. Maybe you have second thoughts. Maybe you decide to put it off for a day or two.

Then, for whatever reason, you don’t buy it – either now, or at any time in the future – even though right at that moment you really wanted it.

So what was missing?

It was a sense of urgency. You had the desire, but you didn’t feel an overwhelming need to buy it right away – so you didn’t.

A real sense of urgency is the “missing ingredient” needed in a lot of sales letters and marketing campaigns that I see online.

Often there is no sense of urgency at all, leaving the potential customer to make up their mind as and when they feel like it. (The problem is, most people put things off, including buying decisions… meaning they are highly likely to forget about the offer.)

Or the sales letter goes to the other extreme, barking “Buy now!” commands repeatedly and attempting to generate a false sense of urgency – “Hurry, because I can’t hold these prices for much longer… I may put the price up at any time!”

The trouble with this is it’s vague, and therefore weak. “At any time” could mean days, weeks or months – or, as is more often the case, never.

What copywriters need to create is a genuine sense of urgency – the feeling that the potential customer MUST have it now, and that they will lose out if they don’t.

We’ll talk more about this another time, but I wanted to tell you that I’m just putting the finishing touches to a free report which will explain precisely how to create a genuine sense of urgency in your sales copy, or with any offer you make.

As a regular CopySnips reader, you’ll be the one of the first to get hold of this free report once I’ve finished it. If you’re not yet a regular reader, subscribe to the RSS feed or by email. Oh yes, you’d better do it now, or you’ll miss out on this crucial information, and will forever be tormented by thoughts of what might have been. Or something like that.

5 Creative Ways To Hide Your Prices (Hiding Prices #5)

Hiding prices

Hiding prices

In this series we’ve been discussing the main reasons why some marketers and copywriters “hide” the price of their product or service. These reasons include wanting to first build strong desire and demonstrate affordability, to show the personal value is higher than the price value, and to change the potential client’s perception of the price – what I call “price conditioning”.

In this last post in the Hiding Prices series I’m going to end it with a bang and share with you some ways you can ethically “hide” your prices, while at the same time making them available to people who really want to know, and have actually read your copy.

Before I do that, I still haven’t answered the BIG question you may be wondering…

“Should I hide my prices or not?”

Only YOU can decide the answer to that. However, my personal suggestion is this:

If your price is a competitive advantage (i.e. you are cheaper than your competitors, or you have a special offer that can make even the skimmer recognize it as a good price), then you might want to do the opposite and make your price more prominent.

Or if your price is low enough that it could be considered an impulse buy, then you might want to leave it on display as normal.

However, if your prices are higher than the “industry standard”, or for very high prices, then I would suggest making your price less prominent or even using one of the techniques I’m about to share with you, because you’ll want to build desire, demonstrate affordability, and show the real value of what you have to offer, before they discover the price.

Otherwise they could use the “high” price (or higher than average price) as an excuse not to read your copy, or be put off by the price.

So then, let me now share with you…

5 Creative Ways Of Hiding Your Prices:


1. Use a new client offer.

Let’s face it, most people love offers. And for new clients, who have to overcome the uncertainty of using your services for the first time, they can be very attractive.

If you’re charging $20 for your service, and someone whom your potential client perceives to be a competitor is charging $10, then create an offer for new clients which makes your service seem more price competitive (i.e. $10 for new clients).

This enables you to emphasize the $10 price for new customers, while de-emphasizing your regular $20 price. Of course, it’s up to you deliver the kind of service that will make them want to come back, even at your regular price. And you’ll want to be upfront about the regular price, so they don’t think you’re suddenly doubling your prices next time round.

2. Break up your sales letter into multiple pages.

As I say that, I can already hear the guillotine being prepared for me by the copywriters who say you should NEVER DO THIS.

“You’ll lose visitors!” I hear them cry in a fit of rage. “Sure,” I would reply. “But all sales letters lose visitors. If your conversion rate is 2%, you’re losing 98% of visitors! At least this way you’ll know where you’re losing them.” If you put your price on Page 4, and 75% of your visitors never get that far, you know that PRICE is not the reason you’re losing that 75%. It’s your COPY.

Here are the advantages of breaking up your sales letter into smaller chunks:

  • It makes your sales letter look much less daunting. Make Page 1 fairly short and appealing, and use it to hook people into reading further.
  • You can focus on one or two specific benefit or thoughts per page. (I’d suggest making each page much smaller than a regular sales letter. Think of this approach as a series of short but fascinating articles leading them to the finale, rather than a “sales letter”).
  • You can track their progress through the sales letter, to find “bottlenecks” and “sticking points”. If you’re losing 75% of visitors on Page 3 of 4, you know that Page 3′s copy is the problem.
  • With each click, you can have them qualify themselves further, and they are also interacting with the copy. In other words, they are no longer passive but active readers.
  • You can “hide” the price on, say, Page 4 – after they’ve clicked through (and hopefully read) 3 short pages rich with benefits and desire building copy.

If you’re going to take this approach, then you’ll need to create highly compelling “cliffhangers” at the end of a page that compel people to click to the next page.

3. Use a $1 trial price.

For recurring billing services, have an X days $1 trial period, and emphasize the $1 price. Of course, before they buy, potential customers will still want to know the regular price, but having an initial trial price will at least relieve some of the psychological need to know the price too early.

Also, $1 allows you to bill them initially, and then rebill them automatically if they don’t cancel. Of course, you MUST (both ethically and legally) make sure they fully understand that they will be rebilled at the regular price before they place their order, but there’s no need to emphasize this at the start of your sales letter.

4. Make only the price of your “cut down” version visible at first.

Here’s the idea: Sell two versions of your product – a cheap, cut down version (at, say, $7)… and then your regular version (i.e. $47). When a new visitor initially scrolls down to skim the price, they see the $7 price, so they scroll back up to pay more attention to the actual copy.

Now, here’s the “sneaky” part. Near the order form, have two “radio” buttons. (These are like checkboxes, but you can only select one of a number of radio buttons). The first radio button is highlighted by default, and it’s for the cut down $7 version of your product. The second is for your main product.

However, your sales copy is primarily written to sell the main product. If they click the radio button for the main product, a little piece of Javascript shows the price of the main product, which was hidden before.

All the reader is doing is selecting the product, and the radio boxes toggle the order form between the two versions. By doing it this way, a skimmer may not notice you’re selling two versions… they would only discover this when they read your copy… which is what you want them to do, anyway.

5. Multiple “add on” options or price points.

For freelance writers and copywriters, one of the techniques I talk about in Write To More Money is to offer different levels of service at different price points, or different “add on” options for different features of your writing. This allows clients to choose the true level of quality they want.

For example, article writers could offer a Bronze, Silver and Gold service… with Bronze being basic “quality” articles that clients are going to use simply to generate backlinks to their site, or to have some content on their site. You might price this at, let’s say $5 or $10 an article.

By contrast, your Gold service is for content that truly shines, that is going to have other bloggers linking to you, that is going to cause readers to say, “Wow… I must read more from this person!”, or even pull out their wallets and purses. You might price your Gold service at, say $15 or $20 an article.

Or with the “add on” (or “upsell”) idea, you provide checkboxes for additional features. If you’ve read my report, you’ll recall I gave you lots of ideas for features you could incorporate into your writing for an additional fee.

When they check one of these “add on” boxes, the price automatically increases. (You can use Javascript to achieve this, or alternatively, many payment processors have a shopping cart facility that will do something similar.)

Again, make sure that skimmers can only see the price of your basic service. The price of the higher quality services, or the “add ons”, are hidden until the visitor actively clicks a checkbox or radio box. So skimmers see your basic price (which hopefully they will see as reasonable enough to read your copy in more detail) and then your copy should sell them on what you really want them to buy – your Gold service.

“But aren’t these misleading my potential clients?”

I respectfully disagree… they are misleading themselves if they think knowing the price in advance is going to help them!

Nobody buys anything without first knowing what they’re going to get for their money, so knowing the price in advance is a bit like reading the end of a book. You don’t know how good an ending it is, until you’ve read what comes before it!

By using one or more of these techniques, you’re helping the potential customer to slow down… and to not rush ahead to the end of the book.

***

I hope you’ve enjoyed this Hiding Prices series, and even if you still don’t think hiding prices is for you, I hope I’ve at least given you an idea as to why some people do it. Tomorrow I’m going to tackle yet another controversial topic – deadlines, urgency and the two most used words in a copywriter’s arsenal: “Buy now”.

Yes, those two words might provide the final trigger, but what really motivates a person to act upon something NOW, rather than later? The answers, I think, will shock and surprise you… so stay tuned to Copysnips FM.

Hiding Prices #4 – The Secret Technique Of Price Conditioning

All this week we’ve been discussing the idea of “hiding” your prices (i.e. not making your prices immediately obvious), and there’s one other major reason some marketers and copywriters hide their prices, and it involves the little-known but immensely powerful concept of price conditioning.

New visitors have faulty price expectations in mind.

When they first visit your website, many of your potential clients have a certain price expectation in mind, which are often based on certain erroneous assumptions.

For example, Peter might have heard or read of other people who had several 500 word articles written at $5 each – so when he comes to your site, his price expectation is $5 an article. Sally’s friend may have had a sales letter written for $500, so Sally expects to be able to get the same price. When she comes to your site, her expectation is that a sales letter costs $500.

On the other hand, let’s say your price is $20 for a 500 word article, or $2,000 for a sales letter. Clearly there is a BIG price difference between Peter’s or Sally’s expectation of price, and your actual price.

Big problem!…

… especially if they discover your price before you’ve established value and built desire. If Peter’s expectation is $5 an article, and you’re at $20 an article, you risk him dismissing your writing service without even reading your sales pitch!

What price conditioning does is it conditions the potential customer to raise their expectations of price… to the point where, when you reveal your price, it’s not as much as they expected – or at the very least, it’s less of a shock.

It’s about changing their perception of your price.

Now, because this is a little understood technique for most writers, and even many copywriters, I devoted an entire chapter to the subject in Write To More Money, but let me touch on just one of the many ways you can condition your clients to expect a higher price.

There are publications in the writing industry that contain standard rates for certain types of writing. So let’s say, according to a particular publication, the standard rate for an article is $40. You can use this piece of information as a price conditioning tool, by referring the client to it, or referencing it in your sales copy.

This can serve to raise their expectation of the price of your articles. (For this to be effective, you’d need to combine this with establishing value and building desire.)

Here’s how it works…

Let’s say Peter comes to your writing website, looking to have some articles written, with an expectation in mind of $5 an article. Your prices are $20 an article, but you “hide” your prices in such a way that he can’t easily find it until he has read at least some of your copy. (We’ll talk about how you can do this in Part #5 of this series).

Your copy skillfully establishes value and builds desire, so he gradually comes to realize all the things that truly high quality articles can deliver for him, such as credibility, authority, subscribers and sales…

… and your copy price conditions him, so he comes to realize his $5 expectation was far too low… but now he’s a little bit scared because you seem be implying that these good quality articles are going to cost him $40, $50 or even $60 an article.

He really wants the kind of quality and results you seem to be offering (you’ve built strong desire) BUT he’s scared of what your prices are going to be. Finally, he gets to discover your pricing… and is relieved that it’s only $20 an article!

He places his order.

Can you see the difference? Without building desire, establishing value, and price conditioning, your $20 articles seem expensive to him, because you’ve done nothing to change his expectation of $5 an article.

And if he can easily find your prices without having to read your copy, he may well pass on reading it, simply because $20 is “expensive” in his mind.

Price conditioning is about changing the potential client’s perspective on your prices, so that they no longer see your prices as “expensive” but as “reasonable” or even “less than they expected”.

But you might not get to do any of that if he’s already decided you’re “too expensive”, and left before he even reads the copy… a major problem if your prices are easy to find.

Price conditioning is a immensely powerful technique, but I can’t do it justice in a blog post, which is why I’d urge you to grab yourself a copy of Write To More Money if you can. I can promise you that knowing and using this technique (in combination with establishing value and building desire) will give you a major advantage over writers and copywriters who don’t know and use it (and I’ve really only touched on it in this post).

In Part #5 of this series, I’m going to give you some ideas on how to ethically “hide” your prices, or at least delay the potential customer from finding out your prices, until you’ve had the chance to establish value, build desire and price condition. (There are many more creative options, besides simply putting your prices on your order form, or leaving them off altogether.)

Hiding Prices #3 – Price Value Versus Personal Value

(This is a continuing discussion of why marketers and copywriters “hide” their prices at times. You can read Hiding Prices #1 and Hiding Prices #2).

Imagine I were to offer you a PDF report for $1,000. Would you buy it?

You’d probably say No, simply because you don’t have enough information on the product, or any real desire for it. So at this point, the price is irrelevant.

Or you might think that $1,000 is way overpriced for a PDF report.

What if I told you this report was worth $10,000 to you… but you could have it for $1,000? Would you buy it now?

You’d still probably say No – because, other than taking my word for it, you have no way of knowing what the report is truly worth to you. (I’ve told you it’s “worth” $10,000… but right now that’s probably an empty claim to you.)

Now, let’s add one additional piece of information. Suppose this PDF report contained next week’s winning lottery numbers, for a $16.7 million lottery prize.

For $1,000… would you buy it now?

Aha… that changes things. Suddenly the contents of the report become very valuable to you indeed. You KNOW the value to you of next week’s lottery numbers… and the $1,000 price seems incredibly cheap.

Of course, this would raise other questions in your mind: How do I know the numbers in advance? Why would I sell these numbers, instead of using them myself? How many others are getting these numbers? Is this a scam? How can I guarantee the winning numbers?… and so on.

But my point here is this… now you know precisely what you’re going to get out of the report, you’d see the $1,000 price in a totally different perspective. If what I’m claiming to offer is true, the value to you is very clear, and so the price is probably seen as exceptional value, and you’d be crazy NOT to beg, steal or borrow to get the money.

Yet without knowing the true value of the report to you, it just seems like another overpriced report.

You see, there are two different ways of valuing a product, which are easily confused:

Price value. This is the value we attach to a product when we set its price. Ultimately, the price value of a $1,000 report is… well, $1,000!

Personal value. This is the value we personally get from the product. In the case of my example, the personal value of knowing those winning lottery numbers is easy to calculate – it’s up to $16.7 million!

Of course, personal value is often subjective. For example, if you had a technique that could double your customer’s sales within a week, only the customer can know what this technique would be worth to them. (As a copywriter you could always ask them the rhetorical question: “How much is knowing X worth to you?”)

And it’s not always about money. For a person suffering with a particular ailment, a report which tells them how to cure that ailment might be of immense personal value, or even priceless.

This is a great basis for a clearer definition of what we mean when we talk about value for money. We think something is good value for money when we are clearly getting more personal value from a product than the price value.

But knowing the price alone does not tell you whether it’s good value for money or not, just as in the case of my imaginary $1,000 report. This is why some copywriters and marketers hide their prices. They first want to build desire, and also demonstrate the potential personal value to the visitor, so the visitor can make a decision based on “value for money”, rather than on simply whether they can “afford it”.

After all, my $1,000 report might sound expensive and overpriced… until you realize what’s in it.

There is yet one other important reason why prices are “hidden” at times, and it’s to do with a negotiating secret you can also use with your clients, so make sure you’re subscribed to this blog so you won’t miss Hiding Prices #4, tomorrow.